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Back to Kenya: Basic to Beautiful with ME to WE

A Twelve Minute Readphoto-8

Throughout my bicycle ride around the world from China to Canada, I came to the grand realization that we are all very much alike. However, our locations, cultures and views threaten to divide us. They threaten to make us feel like we are different. That our common man or women are removed from our current reality. That we are somehow better than someone else by mere circumstance. These are dangerous notions which only perpetuate the feelings expressed behind the glass wall of social media forums or news programs.

We are all very much alike in our personal wants and desires. If you take away the money, greed and power, the root of the humanity can be found in a few basic needs. The need for food on the table, sanitation, access to healthcare, clean water, shelter and opportunity. Beyond these basic necessities, we all want to feel love and connection. A connection to family and friends. To call a few people our close ones. To feel that returning feeling of love, forgiveness and warmth.

We all deserve access to these basic and affectionate sides of the human experience. We can help people achieve the basic pieces of the puzzle, but the soulful side is in the hands of the individual. Share that individuality on a local and global scale.

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“The purpose of life is not to be happy. It is to be useful, to be honorable, to be compassionate, to have it make some difference that you have lived and lived well.” ~ Ralph Emerson, Writer

The sun cracks over the walled green horizon. In the morning glow, the Maasai Mara comes to life. Roosters make their morning call, donkey’s neigh and the chatter of women can be heard in the distance. One of the oldest areas of human life begins another day. A life of simplicity, family and challenge.

The little things are but part of the daily existence called life. Words like water, food and shelter. We call these words basic rights, but for many these are in top priority for the day. The morning chores, the weight of the water bucket, the cleaning and preparation of available food are part of a greater effort being enacted here.

Arriving back in Kenya was one of those experiences which drove me down a tunnel of introspective nostalgia. I have now accepted a position at WE Charity as a Motivational Outreach Speaker. I am incredibly excited about this opportunity. It will be a unique chance to share my story of cycling around the world with youth and adults alike across Canada and the US, while promoting the sustainable development work of WE Charity. Though leaving my position as a Teacher after finishing my bike ride was difficult, it is an opportunity I could not turn down. I am incredibly proud and excited to share this news.

The new position prompted my return to Kenya on the biannual staff trip. It was in this capacity I could gain a stronger perspective of the work being done on an international scale, come to understand the programs in place and meet some of my new colleagues. It would give me an opportunity to give back to the communities I partnered with nearly two years ago.

As we drove out to the Maasai Mara, I relived my cycling route out towards Narok. Rolling along the hilly landscape that winds out of Nairobi, I found myself retracing my steps. I saw ghosts of conversations I had along the way. A shop where I had a broken bracket welded and a bottled Pepsi rest spot sped on by as my eyes wandered.

One spot in particular stood out as we stopped at the view point over the Great Rift Valley. The cradle of life lay before me once again. It was Canada Day July 1st, 2015 that I stopped there to have a bite of lunch and a view. Moments later a bus load of Canadians stopped by and I was able to share an afternoon break with some people from home. This was one of the more memorable look out points on my entire trip, not just because of the view, but because of the historical as well as the personal significance the valley represents. There I snapped the same picture and returned to our ME to WE lorry with a smile where new friendships were forming.

Arriving at camp was a welcome experience, getting to know our wonderful facilitators, Maasai guides and more team members. Over the next week we would eat, work and learn together. It was an action packed ten days at camp. We learned about the history, culture and challenges of life in Kenya, particularly for the Kipsigis and Maasai peoples. Here we made new bonds and came to understand the stark differences that separate our world. Access to water, food, education, healthcare and opportunity were always at the forefront.

“If you’re in the luckiest one per cent of humanity, you owe it to the rest of humanity to think about the other 99 per cent.” ~ Warren Buffett, Business Magnate

Throughout the week a variety of activities were designed to give you a sense of the daily reality people endure. We participated in traditional water walks where lugging a huge jug of water back from the nearest river is the norm. This experience gives you a deep understanding of how precious water is when taking into account the wastefulness of our Canadian brothers and sisters. If we had to walk a kilometre with a large bucket of water on our backs five to ten times a day, we would all reconsider our use of water.

We beaded like the Mama artisans who participate in the opportunity pillar projects making a wide variety of fair trade items for sale through ME to WE. You learn how important these types of empowerment projects are in the lives of the local people. It allows them to send their kids to school, buy medicines and provide for their families in a way that was previously impossible.

These projects are supplemented by ‘merry-go-round’ initiatives which enable women as well as men to make investments into larger items in their household or community through a roundabout style collection and distribution of money. Basically, everyone puts in $10 and eventually it will be there turn to use $100 or more for something that would improve their lives. It is amazing what these people can accomplish with a simple hand-up. It is not a handout, but a hand-up to create sustainable change for future generations.

During the trip we had a variety of local entertainers join us. We went on a safari drive deep in game reserve territory where we saw elephants, zebras, gazelles, warthogs, buffalo wildebeest, giraffes, vultures, hyenas and even watched a huge pod of hippos while eating bagged lunches. We participated in weapons training where we launched arrows and threw traditional Maasai weapons called rungus into the afternoon heat. There was a rungu making session as well as Swahili lessons.

There were two huge ceremonies for the surrounding communities while we were in Kenya. The opening of the boys High School was a huge highlight and a massive step forward for education in the community. We also got to experience the graduation ceremony at the Kisaruni girls High School. Of all the groups of young learners I have ever met in my life, these are the most dedicated, mature, strong and powerful young ladies I have ever met. When I first had the opportunity to meet these girls I was blown away by their enthusiasm and often thought about how often we take education for granted back in Canada.

For myself, one of the most amazing aspects was visiting the Baraka Hospital, especially the surgical wing. When I was in Kenya a year and a half ago the surgical wing of the beautiful Baraka hospital was only a foundation. During my time there I participated in laying some cement in the work site. At the time it was difficult to envision what the end product would look like. Seeing the finished product and realizing the greater picture of change it would enact is hard to describe. When people travel hours down bumpy roads to get to a hospital only to be told they had to again travel another few hours to a hospital which offers surgical procedures, must be crushingly difficult. Soon, that will no longer be the case with the surgical wing opening in February.

The list of experiences and accomplishments goes on. The work being realized by WE Charity in Kenya is truly inspiring and difficult to accurately describe in full. All of the projects are interconnected to one another. The model of sustainable development has been put in place to a point where life events are coming full circle. People who went through the school system in communities which are now independent have gone off to university and returned to become teachers that give back to the community they grew up in.

The work here is truly changing and improving lives on a daily basis. It is something I am very proud to attach my name to. Helping communities rediscover their independence through projects they can be proud of has shaped future generations to come. Of the many communities WE Charity has partnered with, many are now completed independent. They have worked to a point where they function as a sustainable unit through the projects that have been implemented. They work under the sustainable model that empowers people through empowering them with education, healthcare, water, food and opportunity programs.

As I transition into my new role as a Motivational Speaker with WE Charity, I thank all of the people who have supported my ride. I thank those that have donated to make a difference in the lives of the people in the communities we sponsored in rural China, India, Kenya, Ecuador and Nicaragua. I thank most of all my wonderful wife, family and friends for being there through it all and helping me get to this point. I am now doing my best to live the message I have been promoting for over the last two years. Speaking for WE will allow me to get that message out there to a much later audience. For that I am eternally grateful for the people at WE Charity. I am so excited to join a team of intensely passionate and energetic people at WE. Together, through challenge and change, we can have a lasting impact on our world.

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*I look forward to continuing to share my adventures on here as my new exciting role with WE Charity begins. I will keep updates rolling as I develop my new speech and take to schools across Canada and the US.

**If you are curious to read about my original time cycling through Kenya, please feel free to CLICK HERE.

***If you haven’t had a peek you can watch my GoPro cycling journey around the world at the bottom of this post.

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2-Year GoPro Bicycle Adventure Around the World

 

 

 

Top 10 FAQ ~ After Cycling the World

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“I am always doing things I can’t do; that’s how I get to do them.” ~ Pablo Picasso, Painter

Since I was a young kid I always loved getting out in nature and having mini-adventures. Building forts, having bonfires and exploring with friends from the countryside of rural Canada was always something that I will look fondly back upon. Growing up in the country allowed me to get hurt and learn from my mistakes. When I finally started my cycling adventure around the world my days spent camping were a constant throwback to a nostalgia that was waiting to be awoken again. Throughout the journey, I made a lot of mistakes, but I learned from those moments of hardship. They have continued to make me stronger and shape the way I see the world from the more comfortable side of the seat.

You never know where you will end up. I would have never thought years ago that I would have actually gone after my dreams and succeeded. That single decision has irreparable changed my life for the better. It has opened my mind to new horizons and given me a deeper perspective on what truly matters in life. There are certain things I no longer take for granted after seeing the hardships of our world firsthand. I see things more clearly than ever before.

In a world that has been so giving I feel that I am obliged to give back in some form, whether it be through charitable work, speaking engagements or maintaining this website. Recently, I spoke at the yearly ‘Just Us Youth Day’ with all Grade 10’s from the Catholic District School Board of Eastern Ontario as the keynote speaker. It was an event I was honoured to be part of. We all have the power to make a change in our lives, community and country. It was inspiring to see the engaging attitude from the youth of tomorrow.

This post of ‘Top 10 FAQ’ was inspired by that talk and the collection of questions I typically get on my ride. If you have any others please feel free to drop me a line at any point.

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“The Wilderness holds answers to more questions than we have yet learned to ask.” ~ Nancy Wynne Newhall, Writer

1-How many countries did you visit? 

I visited 40 countries on my round the world cycling tour. I have travelled to over 60 countries total in my life. Other notable adventures include a motorbike adventure through the wild steppe of Mongolia and the rolling beauty of Laos. I also have fond memories from my backpacking trips in Bangladesh and Myanmar.

 

2-How old are you?

I am 28 years old. I began the trip around the world when I just turned 26. I am happy that I started the trip when I did. However, it is never too old to begin an adventure such as this. I met people doing similar things who were more than twice my age. I believe that a journey such as this ages you internally, rather externally.

 

3-What is your favourite country? Least favourite country?

This is one of the toughest questions of all. I really do not have a favourite country from the journey. I like different countries for different reasons. For example, I like Mexico, Greece and India because of the food. I liked Peru and Lesotho because of the diverse stunning views. I like Kyrgyzstan, Sudan, Afghanistan, Turkey, South Africa, Paraguay, Colombia and Mexico because of the people. I liked Bolivia and India for the mental as well as physical challenge. China because it will always hold a special place in my heart. I like Canada because it feels like home. I do not have a least favourite country, however, I did have a very difficult time in Ethiopia. But, that is a story for another day.

 

4-Did you ever feel lonely?

The honest answer, rarely. I think if I did this trip even ten years ago I would have felt a lot more of that lonesome feeling. However, with the recent development and improvement of new communication technology I was typically able to stay fairly connected to my wife as well as people back home when I wanted to. In most of the world, phone plans are quite cheap. I would simply get a SIM card and top it up with some 3G data. There are simpler ways to do this, but I became an expert in figuring out the easiest way to communicate back home. When I knew there might be long periods where I would be out of touch, I would try to let certain people know in advance, so they didn’t worry. They still worried though.

 

5-Did you ever have any problems along the way?

This is the most popular question of all. It is the most popular question because when people ask they are not asking about problems with my bike. They are asking if I was ever basically robbed, frightened or threatened along the way. The truthful honest answer is always a resounding no. In Peru I had a very tiny problem where someone stole my bicycle tools out of my bag at a busy port in Iquitos. Other than that, absolutely not. There were the daily challenges of finding food, places to sleep and the elements of course. I was hit by an ice cream truck in Greece, which was an accident I am lucky to have walked away from. If anything people were too kind in most of the places I visited. People are just nice, that is a fact.

 

6-Did you ever get lostHow did you know the way?

I was never really lost on my journey. Everything was always new, so I was in a way lost most of the time. I had a good navigation system using HERE Maps and consulted paper maps whenever possible. I had an external power source which allowed me to charge my electronics for up to four days. Between that time, I could take a break somewhere to get things booted up. If I had to do it again I would get a dynamo hub that charges your gadgets while you ride.

I really did not know the way, but would plan key points I would like to reach as a guiding direction. The plan changed almost daily as I lay awake in my tent planning routes at night. Some countries I missed entirely as routes, weather and feeling guided me towards another. As I got close I would research Visa expectations and what would be feasible. You are never really lost if you are not sure exactly where it is you were supposed to be in the first place.

 

7-Are you married?

Yes. I am newly married to my wonderfully supportive wife Eliza. You can actually check out our wedding story from China with explanations, videos and pictures by CLICKING HERE.

 

8-Did you have any sponsors and how did you pay for the journey?

I get this one a lot more often from adults. Many believe it must take a massive sum of money to take off on a trip for two years. Most of these people are used to the week away holidays and do not understand the actual cost on the ground as the locals live. I will say that I had a good job and I made saving money for the adventure a top priority. Some people save for a new fancy car, I saved to have an adventure of a lifetime with memories to last the same.

On a daily basis I tried to live very cheaply and camp for free whenever possible. I took breaks to get caught up on my life in cheap hostels and guesthouses. In many places I could find a place to sleep for 10$. It was not luxurious, but it was a place to sleep and that is all I needed. On days where I ‘free camped’ I could usually live off around 5-10$ a day. If I had enough food on me, sometimes I would spend nothing in a day. Of course unexpected costs arose, airplane tickets between continents were a hassle and paying for a fair amount of travel visas got slightly expensive. But other than these types of things my day-to-day was fairly cheap. I have no exact number and frankly, I don’t want to know how much I spent. There are no regrets in that respect. Money is made to be spent. I would rather spend mine on memories.

I did have a massive support base of people from all over who helped me raise enough money to build schools throughout the world. You can read a recent post on an update from all five of the countries we were able to build schools in with WE Charity by CLICKING HERE.

 

9-Would you ever do it again?

This is a tough question. Would I do the exact same trip over again? The simple answer is no. Well not right away. I would return to almost every country I have visited, but knowing everything I know about how difficult some of the places along the way were, I would be hard pressed to get out there and do it all over again.

That being said, after getting back into a comfortable sort of life, I do yearn a bit for that thrill of adventure. That big question mark of the day. The wonder and awe for the world. The beautiful camp spots and the friendly locals that go with exotic lands. I am always looking to new places and there are quite a number of locations along the way I had to make hard choices about. Places like Iran, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Tunisia, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, Zambia, Namibia, Chile and more of the Balkans.

I would have liked to go everywhere of course. All of these places were serious considerations and hard bypasses. Some places I chose over others and some it simply wasn’t in the cards. Time of year, visa restrictions, conflict, logistics and the mood of the day changed my course quite regularly.

It is my hope that I can go back some day and fill in some of these gaps. I desperately would like to see Iran, Pakistan, more of the Middle East and Western Africa. I was not going to rush it then and I am not going to rush it now. It is a long life.

 

10-What made you want to cycle the world?

A huge combination of things led to me wanting to cycle the world. However, actually getting started is another thing entirely. It is one thing to dream, but another to go live it. The dream was born back in university after reading an excellent book on the topic and deciding that was something I would also like to do. After first it was a hopefully little idea, then it became something I had to do. It was during a time that my love for international travel was growing. I devoured travel books by the dozens and poured over the globe with dreams of wild far off lands from the literature I was reading.

In 2010 I moved to South Korea for a year to teach English. I had a phenomenal time getting to know a culture I knew almost nothing about before going. It was here that I really started to travel on my own to new exotic lands. I returned to Canada to get my Bachelor of Education and then got an incredible offer at a Canadian International School in Sanya, China. It was here that I knew I would begin my cycling trip around the world after my two-year contract was complete. I would have time to save some money and mentally prepare for such a journey.

During my time in China I further entrenched my love for travel and explored a variety of very interesting countries in Asia like Mongolia, Bangladesh, Myanmar and Philippines to name a few. I always travelled light and cheaply. This was preparing me for the challenges that were to come.

Before I left, I knew that I also wanted to do something more than just ride circles around the world. I wanted to give back. Education was something I was very passionate about. After careful research and a few phone calls, I found that Free the Children a Canadian based International charity was a perfect match for me. In the beginning, I was not sure how the charity would be received. I had goals of raising enough money to build five schools, in five different countries that I would go through. The locations on the map I believed would keep me motivated and moving towards a larger goal that would continue to give back long after my ride was done. I started with one school and worked my way up from there.

When I finally set out, it was this dream of a putting forth a challenge bigger than myself. As the final days of preparation loomed, I felt a sense of extreme fear and excitement all at the same time. The dream was finally coming true after six long years of quietly daydreaming. I wanted to read, write, meet people, take photographs, experience hardship, failure, get to know myself and most of all, feel alive. For all of those reasons, I set off into the wild unknown. It was just something I had to do.

 

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*Thank you to all the people who continue to follow and read my website. It is because of you that I continue to write and share my story. I am also working away at my book when time affords. Be patient, these things take time.

**News on a big change for the new year to come soon!

***In my presentations, I do not show the whole clip of my cycling trip around the world, but just the first few minutes. I am working towards a more concise and revised version. In the meantime, enjoy!

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The Five Villages: Our Impact and the $50,000 Goal

An Twelve Minute Read

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“No one has ever become poor by giving.” ~ Anne Frank, Writer

This past week I was privileged enough to attend WE Day in Toronto. It was one of those experiences that really puts the pieces of our work into perspective. As I watched other change makers and hopefuls share their story, it truly was inspiring. To see the roar of the crowd and the countless people who believe in a better future take the stage was something I will never forget. To see the messages received by the youth of tomorrow and feel that connection was fantastic. Whether it was Gord Downie or Fire Chief Darby Allen sharing their stories, it seemed like we are all working together for something greater. A better future for all. Equality, change and perspective are things I think the world needs to continue to strive towards.

I often think back to those moments on the road. The times of extreme high and low. The poverty and riches that I saw along the way. Both extremes have left a lasting impact on the way that I now see the world. From cobbled roads of Italy, to the hectic Indian byways. From the affluence that is the western world and the imaginary lines that separate similar lands. I have flashbacks to faces and places that now only seem like images of a dream I once knew. The good, the horribly difficult and the monotone moments of challenging bliss in-between.

During those days I smiled a million smiles and felt the weight of my dream on my shoulders. Sometimes, the immensity of my goal weighed a little heavy. When the mountains snaked up on tiny roads beyond my sight or roads stretched out to nameless expanses, I felt that pull forward and pull back to reality. Was I going to make it home? Would people care enough to donate to my cause? Was it all worth it? The answer to all those questions was and always will be a resounding, yes.

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“It always seems impossible, until it’s done.”  – Nelson Mandela, Freedom Fighter

(Below you can read the five-page full update from WE Charity on all of our schools fundraising projects throughout the world. Very exciting!)

Along this journey I had the unique opportunity to help give back. With well over three-hundred sponsors we were able to raise $50,000 for Free the Children (WE Charity). I am blown away by both sides of this accomplishment. The whole experience taught me a good deal about the people I call family and friends, as well as those throughout our world who wished to make it a better place. It showed me that one idea really can make a difference. That we can change someone’s world for the better.

Throughout those two years, people from all over the globe reached out to help me achieve my goal. However, in the process, it became a collective mission. It was no longer just one crazy guy’s idea on a bike. It was a goal that is now shared by hundreds of people. There were even schools throughout Eastern Ontario that rose to the occasion and helped push the metre ever higher. Without the endless donations and goodwill, our collective goal of giving children in struggling nations access to safe and reliable education would have never been possible. Five schools in five different countries.

I will admit, when I first set out, though my hopes were high, I did not know how far or how well the charitable portion of my journey would be received. I had this dream inside my heart of five schools in five countries around the world. However, I set out with one to start. I did not want to look over ambitious or fail miserably for the whole world to see. However, by the time I reached the edge of the Chinese frontier in Xinjiang Province, the goal for the schoolhouse in GuangMing, China was achieved. As I crossed into Kyrgyzstan on a cool afternoon, I knew we could achieve great things if we worked together. It truly was a feeling like no other.

To be able to give back to a country which meant so much to me, was a sign of good things to come. The school in China’s Sichuan province has been complete for some time now and I assure you the effects of which are felt on a daily basis. For the people that live in Guang Ming it represents a chance at a better future. A future that has more than hope at the end of it. Though I was unable to visit the community due to horrible flooding of the road, I plan to make a journey there at some point soon. To see the faces of the change and hear their stories. Sichuan was one of  my favourite sections of China and it is a place that will always call me to return.

As I continued to bike, the support rolled with my tires. Countless people continued to donate and some even began to donate for a second time. On the road, I would connect with my sponsors through personalized emails. I wanted to know what made these people feel the pull towards my cause and thank them for their generosity. No matter if it was $1000 or $10, I sent a message all the same. Every donor meant the world to me while I was on the road. I knew that people were giving what they could and sometimes even when they couldn’t. It gave me the energy boost I needed. Sometimes, when I was feeling down or lonely, a donation from a friendly stranger would ignite the flame inside to keep moving.

In India, I visited the community of Verdara. I was greeted by long time change maker Lloyd and his team with WE charity. Thanks to my supporters, a new schoolhouse has been added to the High School where there previously was none. Children have access to a higher education than has ever been possible in their community. They no longer have to walk far distances or move to continue their education. I saw the smiling faces of their youth and experienced a celebration like no other in their village. You can read about and see photos of my experiences in Verdara HERE.

When I reached Kenya, I was met by the warm handshake and laughter of the Masaai people. I explored the daily life of the community, along with their struggles and victories. Here I learned the value of community. I saw their thirst for education, carried water buckets and practiced how to throw a rungu. By the time I reached the bottom of Africa, the fundraising for the schoolhouse in Esinoni, Kenya was complete. I knew we would make the final goal with continued hard work and support. You can read about my days in the Masaai Mara with Me to We HERE.

In the Andean mountains of Ecuador, I pedalled on up to the community of Shuid. Here I saw the struggles of mountain life mix with natural beauty. I was met by Ryan and his generous team. The views were spectacular and the need the same. The dichotomy of all these places truly amazed me. Later that week as I pedalled into Quito, I wondered about the little community on the side of the mountain. I walked about a glimmering shopping mall in search of some peanut butter for the road, wondering about the hard divisions that separate our world. Seeing all that their city counterparts had, I knew that achieving the goal here was more important than ever. Now the two-storey building is nearing completion thanks to my countless sponsors. To read about my experiences in Shuid CLICK HERE.

On the dog days stretch of Central America, I burned into Nicaragua after a 8 day ride from Panama City. I was feeling the push for home. The end was in sight, but I knew I had unfinished business. The two years on the road had taken a toll on my mind and body. I was stronger than ever physically, but my mind was wavering. Once I met my friend Camillo from WE Charity and biked down to the community of El Trapiche with a group of boys, my resolve was stronger than ever. The $50,000 mark would be no problem at all. I returned to Canada with a mission and after a few short weeks the final goal came on a day just like any other. A feeling I can now proudly share with all of my sponsors. You can read about my time in El Trapiche HERE.

You can get involved with WE Charity or experience your own ME to WE journey by CLICKING HERE.

“He who allows his day to pass by without practicing generosity & enjoying life’s pleasures…breathes but does not live.” ~ Sanskrit Proverb

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I have now returned to a life of a little more comfort. There is food in my fridge and a warm bed waiting for me each day. I have my wife, family and friends close by. All the little things that many of us take for granted, have been returned to me once again. But we always want what we can’t have. I still look at maps from time to time and have burst of nostalgia that almost hurts. When I ride my old beat-up bike to and fro I feel the pedals looking for the next hill. In some moments I wished I went a little bit slower or spent a day longer here or a week there. Sometimes, I wish I was still out there with the morning sun, evening stars, my tent and four bags. But, that was one adventure. Everything happened the exact way it should have. Had I stayed one place longer, I would have missed one person or another that directly changed the course of my journey and in turn the future of my life. I am on the next adventure and I can’t wait. No regrets. It was the ride of a lifetime.

I will never forget a feeling I had one night two weeks into my trip. While laying awake in my tent, I was looking at a map of China and the world. I had skirted a small slice of the monster that was China and put a pinprick on the world. I was going nowhere fast. I was terrified, alone and feeling down. I had left everything behind to pursue some crazy dream that looked better on paper than it was looking at this moment in real life. I took a deep breath and felt the world crashing down on me. I suddenly found that the idea of the whole world was too big. They journey was going to be too much to handle if I kept looking at it in this way. It was in this moment that I decided to live each day as it came. Forget about the long off finish line. This moment forever changed the rest of my ride and the happiness I felt in my interactions on a daily basis. Sometimes, I still need to remind myself of these moments as I pick away at my book and my goals for the future. One day at a time.

We too can all achieve great things with time, patience and a little help. I believe that with hard work and dedication, anything can be achieved in time. Without the help of all my donors, I would never have been able to get through some of the wild and difficult places that were thrown at me along the way. Without those days and the people who came at the right time, I would not be who I am today. For everyone that helped make a difference and construct the five schools in China, India, Kenya, Ecuador and Nicaragua, thank you. On behalf of all the people we have helped, a boisterous thank you. For believing in me, I humbly thank you all.

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*Please see the inspiring full update from the good people at WE Charity (Free the Children) below as well as my YouTube video from around the world.

**In my following posts I will begin by highlighting some of the truly awesome people that I met on my way around the world. It is my duty now to share their stories and their world.

***To see my charity page from the journey and a rolling list of all the wonderful donors, schools and businesses, please CLICK HERE.

****You can also check out my alternate website at www.tinysbest.com.

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My Cycling Journey Around the World

Gord Downie at WE Day

 

 

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